Who Are Our Supreme Court Justices?

Associate Justices (Ranked In Seniority):

Antonin Scalia

(Nominated by Pres. Ronald W. Reagan; seated Sept. 26, 1986)

Perhaps the most outspoken Justice on the Court on the topic of sticking to the original understanding of the U.S. Constitution, Scalia has been critical of the Court's attempts to destroy marriage. This is from his dissent in the 2013 Windsor case:

"But to defend traditional marriage is not to condemn, demean, or humiliate those who would prefer other arrangements, any more than to defend the Constitution of the United States is to condemn, demean, or humiliate other constitutions. …It is one thing for a society to elect change; it is another for a court of law to impose change by adjudging those who oppose it hostes humani generis, enemies of the human race."

Anthony M. Kennedy

(Nominated by Pres. Ronald W. Reagan; seated Feb. 18, 1988)

Justice Kennedy is widely regarded as the "swing vote" on the nine-member Court, and has been the 5th vote on many pivotal cases, including the 2013 Windsor case, involving the federal marriage statute. Kennedy actually wrote the majority opinion, declaring the federal definition of one-man, one-woman marriage was an insult to gays and lesbians.

It is not an overstatement to say that Kennedy is the key justice in this case. Pray God will move in Justice Kennedy's heart to restrain him from re-writing the U.S. Constitution and the definition of marriage in this case.

Clarence Thomas

(Nominated by Pres. George H. W. Bush; seated Oct. 23, 1991)

Appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1991 by President George H.W. Bush, Justice Thomas is a steadfast defender of the U.S. Constitution and marriage. He voted for one-man, one-woman marriage in the 2013 Windsor case. And while he almost never asks questions during oral arguments, his written opinions are forceful and compelling.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

(Nominated by Pres. Bill J. Clinton; seated Aug. 10, 1993)

A former ACLU lawyer, the reliably liberal Justice Ginsburg was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court by President Clinton in 1993. In recent interviews, Ginsburg said."[I]t would not take a large adjustment" for Americans should the Supreme Court decide to redefine marriage for the entire country. She also voted to strike down the federal definition of one-man, one-woman marriage in the 2013 Windsor case.

Stephen G. Breyer

(Nominated by Pres. Bill J. Clinton; seated Aug. 3, 1994)

A former Harvard professor, Department of Justice lawyer and assistant special prosecutor in the Watergate scandal of the early 1970s, Justice Breyer has been a federal judge since 1980, and a Supreme Court Associate Justice since 1994, when he was appointed by President Clinton.

Breyer's judicial philosophy is quite liberal on most social issues, including same-sex marriage, and he voted to strike down the federal one-man, one-woman marriage definition in the 2013 Windsor case.

Samuel A. Alito, Jr.

(Nominated by Pres. George W. Bush; seated on Jan. 31, 2006)

Also appointed by President George W. Bush, Justice Alito was also a strong defender of marriage in the 2013 Windsor case, which struck down the federal definition of marriage.

Do you agree with what he said in his dissent in that case?

"But the Constitution simply does not speak to the issue of same-sex marriage. In our system of government, ultimate sovereignty rests with the people, and the people have the right to control their own destiny. Any change on a question so fundamental should be made by the people through their elected officials."

Sonia Sotomayor

(Nominated by Pres. Barack H. Obama; seated on Aug. 8, 2009)

Appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court by President Obama in 2009, Justice Sotomayor has been a federal judge since 1992. She consistently votes with the liberal wing of the Court, and voted against the federal definition of marriage in the 2013 Windsor case.

Elena Kagan

(Nominated by Pres. Barack H. Obama; seated on Aug. 9, 2009)

A former Harvard Law professor and dean, as well as the Solicitor General under President Obama, Kagan was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court in 2010. She is part of the liberal wing of the Court, and voted against one-man, one-woman marriage in the 2013 Windsor decision.

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