Tweens and Their Activities

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Rebecca Gibbon
An idea for helping kids understand that their activities are not the only thing happening in your family.

When tweens begin to set priority on friends and activities, you can help them understand that what they are doing is not the family’s main priority. Here are some ideas for training them to find the right balance within their new social life: 

Driving Miss Tween

Tweens often assume their parents will drive them to any movie theater, shopping
mall or birthday party they want to attend. Naturally, I didn’t mind driving my daughter to a school
event or youth group meeting, but she needed to know I was not at her beck and call.

We set
up some ground rules. If it took me 15 minutes to drive to the mall, she needed to spend 15 minutes
vacuuming the car, walking the dog or doing another chore. She quickly gained an appreciation for my
time and no longer saw me as her personal chauffeur.

—Silvana Clark

Balancing Family and Friends

Tweens typically want to hang out with friends every weekend, so setting ground rules can help a tween learn to balance family time and her social calendar. One mother sets a clear expectation. “If my child asks to have a friend over with the friend standing next to her, the answer is always no.” If asked ahead of time, she’ll consider it. Her tween learns to respect Mom’s time and her decision.

To accommodate this need for friendship and allow for family time, some families let children invite friends — one per child — to outings. Others alternate every Saturday between letting their tween have a friend over and going to a friend’s house.

—Bridget A. Nelan

 

“Tweens and Their Activities” compiled article © 2017 by Focus on the Family. “Driving Miss Tween” © 2017 by Silvana Clark. “Balancing Family and Friends” © 2008 by Bridget A. Nelan. Used by permission.  “Driving Miss Tween” first appeared in the August/September 2017 issue of Focus on the Family magazine. “Balancing Family and Friends” appeared in the January/February 2013 issue of Thriving Family and the May 2008 issue of “Focus on Your Child” Tween Ages as “Set Boundaries.”

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Understand How to Respect and Love your Son Well

Why doesn’t my son listen to me? Have you ever asked that question? The truth is, how you see your son and talk to him has a significant effect on how he thinks and acts. That’s why we want to help you. In fact, we’ve created a free five-part video series called “Recognizing Your Son’s Need for Respect” that will help you understand how showing respect, rather than shaming and badgering, will serve to motivate and guide your son.
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About the Author

various authors

This article is a compilation of articles written by various authors. The author names are found within the article.

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