Holy Week and Easter Activities for the Whole Family

Illustration of a father, mother, son and daughter eating a passover seder meal.
Shahar Kober

Bring the Easter story to life for your kids through one amazing download and four easy-to-use, age-appropriate activities:

Walking Through Holy Week

Focus on the Family’s free Easter activity kit retraces the events of Jesus’ final days on earth, helping kids learn more about Christ’s sacrifice and victory over death. This free kit includes craft ideas, recipes, puzzles, eight days of faith-based activities and object lessons, and easy-to-follow instructions for an authentic Passover meal. Sign in to download it now!

—T.F. Edwords

Preschool Activity

Retell and celebrate the Resurrection story with your child by creating a preschool version of "Resurrection eggs." Gather six plastic eggs, each a different color. Place the following items inside, one item per egg: breadcrumb, paper cross, strip of cloth, rock and piece of candy. One egg will remain empty. As you tell the Resurrection story, let your child open the eggs. Explain each item in the following order:

1. Bread crumb: Jesus ate dinner with His friends. (Luke22:14-15)

2. Cross: The next day, Jesus died on the Cross. (John19:17-18)

3. Strip of cloth: He was wrapped in cloth and placed in a tomb.

(John 19:40)

4. Rock: A stone was placed in front of the tomb. (Matthew27:59-60)

5. Empty egg: Jesus' friends came to the tomb and saw the stone had been moved. The tomb was empty! (Luke 24:1-3)

6. Candy: Jesus is alive. That's the sweet surprise of Easter. (Matthew 28:5-6)

Once you've finished sharing the Resurrection story with your child, encourage her to use the eggs to tell the story in her own words.

Becky Baudouin

School-age Activity

Use this activity to help your kids understand that Christ's resurrection means that we can have eternal life!

Lay a skein of yarn on a table and pull 2 inches of yarn from one end. Ask your child to slowly pull on this piece, and when she has pulled out about an arm's length of yarn, snip it off with scissors. Tell your kids that this piece of yarn has a beginning and an end, just like our lives here on earth.

Take the snipped piece of yarn and tie it back onto the skein, explaining that, through Christ, we are free to live with God forever. When Jesus died and rose again, He gave us eternal life. Although our time on earth will come to an end, our life with God will go on and on forever. Celebrate the power of the Resurrection by allowing your kids to pull freely on the piece of yarn and run with it as it unravels from the skein. Let them run out of the room! Up the stairs!

Pray together, thanking God for sending His Son and welcoming us into eternal life with Him.

—Vance Fry

Tween Activity

To teach your tweens about the forgiving power of Christ's resurrection, try this activity. First, put on an old, white T-shirt. Then discuss what sin is by asking your tweens to share some examples, such as lying or envy. Invite them to use permanent markers to write their examples on the shirt.

Explain that our sins create a rift in our relationship with God and keep us from experiencing His love. To be reconciled with God, we need to get rid of the sin that separates us. Ask for ideas on how to remove the marker stains from the shirt. If the kids suggest washing it, try scrubbing it in the sink. Let them see that the stains are permanent. Also note how the "sins" can't be hidden, even if the shirt is turned inside out.

Ask: "If we can't remove our own sin, who can help us?" Guide your tweens toward understanding that only Jesus, through His death and resurrection, has the power to get rid of our sins. Take the old, dirty shirt and place it in a trash bag near a Bible or a cross, where you've also set anew, clean white shirt. As you put on the clean shirt, talk about how Christ takes away our sin and gives us His righteousness (2 Corinthians 5:21).

—Jeannie Vogel

Time With Your Teen

The thrill of driving, the freedom to ignore homework, the delight of staying on the computer all night long—teens love to assert their independence. They hold tight to a "my way is the best way" attitude that influences the choices they make during these formative years. Sometimes that attitude protects them from peer pressure; other times it drives them to settle for less than God's best.

Could the power of the Resurrection and the hope of eternity actually make a difference for a teen who is torn between choosing God's will and doing his own thing?

As parents, we get to be the voice reminding teens that pleasing Christ is better than pleasing self. Living with an eternal perspective can help them see that the joy of living forever in God's presence far outweighs the momentary satisfaction of getting their own way.

The same power that raised Christ from the dead is available to strengthen our teens to make wise choices today (Romans 8:11-14). Ask your teen about choices she's watched her friends make that were not pleasing to God. Were there any disappointing consequences? Ask your teen if his friends have shared stories about decisions they regret. Share honestly about your own teenage choices to either choose God's best or have things your way.

Now remind your teen that God has provided all she needs to live a life pleasing to Him—both now and forever (2 Peter 1:3). Encourage your teen to trust God for the strength to do His will, and pray that the hope of eternity will empower her to choose wisely (Colossians 1:10-12).

—T.F. Edwords 

“Walking Through Holy Week” first appeared in the February/March 2016 issue of Thriving Family. “Preschool Activity,” “School-age Activity,” “Tween Activity,” and “Time With Your Teen” first appeared in the article “Resurrection: The Most Important Truth” in the March 2012 issue of Thriving Family magazine. If you enjoyed this article, read more like it in Thriving Family, a marriage and parenting magazine published by Focus on the Family. Get Thriving Family delivered to your home by subscribing to it for a gift of any amount.

“Holy Week and Easter Activities for the Whole Family” compilation: © 2016 by Focus on the Family. “Walking Through Holy Week” paragraph: Copyright © 2016 by Focus on the Family. “Preschool Activity”: Copyright © 2012 by Becky Baudouin. Used by permission. “School-age activity”: Copyright © 2012 by Focus on the Family. “Tween activity”: Copyright © 2012 by Jeannie Vogel. Used by permission. “Time with your teen”: Copyright © 2012 by Focus on the Family.

Next in this Series: Why Easter Matters

You Might Also Like: