$1.3 Million Matching Opportunity

Help provide unique resources to families hurt by the pandemic!

Click Here to Double Your Gift

Yes, DOUBLE MY GIFT to help families!

$1.3 Million Matching Opportunity

Help provide unique resources to families hurt by the pandemic!

Click Here to Double Your Gift

Yes, DOUBLE MY GIFT to help families!

$1.3 Million Matching Opportunity

Help provide unique resources to families hurt by the pandemic!

Click Here to Double Your Gift

Yes, Double my gift to help families!

Dating Rejection

By Su Wright
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email
Stefano Cavoretto/Shutterstock
How one parent helped her teen through the dating years and a time of rejection.

My teenage son picked me up from work. As he pulled into traffic, he said quietly, “Laurie and I broke up today.” Laurie had been his steady girlfriend for nearly a year.

I had to say something, but I wasn’t sure what words would comfort him. One of the hardest parenting tasks I’ve experienced is in helping my sons get through the teenage dating years. Each one has responded differently to rejection. Each one has needed a different response from me.

Asking questions

I glanced at him and saw that he had tears flowing down his cheeks. I needed to understand the situation better, so I asked him, “What was her reason?”

“She said she needed space. That she wanted to date other boys. She wants to be friends.”

“And how do you feel about it?” I knew that was a stupid question; obviously he was hurting, but I also knew he had to verbalize his feelings in order to heal.

Listenting 

I let him talk on the drive. He wouldn’t talk about it once we arrived home. He didn’t want his father or older brothers to see him red-faced and tear-stained. I mostly listened. What he didn’t need to hear was that he was young and there was plenty of time to find a lasting relationship. I told him it would hurt for a while and that he probably couldn’t see it now, but time would bring healing. I told him I didn’t have a perfect answer for him, but if he wanted to talk some more, I was available.

My son is older now, and he did live through the rejection. He hasn’t found the right woman yet, but he does continue to share his feelings with me. Because I didn’t judge him or blame the teenage girl, he’s learned that he can use me as a sounding board. I treasure that relationship and am grateful that I apparently had a wise moment when he talked to me years ago.

© 2007 by Su Wright. Used by permission.

Emerson-Eggerich4-840w

Understand How to Respect and Love your Son Well

Why doesn’t my son listen to me? Have you ever asked that question? The truth is, how you see your son and talk to him has a significant effect on how he thinks and acts. That’s why we want to help you. In fact, we’ve created a free five-part video series called “Recognizing Your Son’s Need for Respect” that will help you understand how showing respect, rather than shaming and badgering, will serve to motivate and guide your son.
Share:
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email

How useful was this article?

Click or Tap on a star to rate it!

Average Rating: 5 / 5

We are sorry that this was not useful for you!

Help us to improve.

Tell us how we can improve this article.

You May Also Like

Fill out the form below, and we will email you a reminder.

Focus on the Family

Have Focus on the Family resources helped your family during the coronavirus pandemic? Share your story today and inspire others!