Marriages and families are in trouble after the challenges of last year.
If it's not too much to ask, would you help equip these families with the resources they need to put Jesus at the center of their home?
Yes, I will help struggling families!
$

Your Child’s Love Language

Share:
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email
Studio-Annika/iStock/Thinkstock
Children express and receive love in different ways — some through acts of service; others through affirming words; still others through gifts, quality time or physical touch. Each of these expressions of love represents a different 'language.'

When my son Payton received an A on his math test, I showered him with praise. He offered a weak smile and retreated to his room.

When I returned home from a business trip, my son Noah asked me to spend time reading with him, but I lavished a bag full of gifts on him instead. I was perplexed by his lukewarm response.

Ungrateful children?

Spoiled youngsters?

Probably not.

I wasn’t speaking their love language. Children express and receive love in different ways — some through acts of service; others through affirming words; still others through gifts, quality time or physical touch. Each of these expressions of love represents a different “language.”

Gary Chapman introduced this concept in his book The Five Love Languages and later in The Five Love Languages of Children, which he co-authored with Dr. Ross Campbell. I spoke with Chapman about how his ideas can help parents transform their relationships with their children.

“Children receive love emotionally,” Chapman said, “but because they are all different, we must pay attention to their individual needs. We must learn to speak our children’s [love] language if we want them to feel loved.”

We often try to pour all our children into the same mold, Chapman said. We go to parenting conferences and read books. We are inundated with great ideas that we want to use with our children. We fail to remember, however, that each child is different. What works with one may not work with another. And what communicates love to one child may not be received the same way by another child.

By understanding the five love languages, we can more easily discern the emotional needs of our children. Here is a brief description of each love language:

Words of affirmation

Compliments such as “Your hair really looks nice today!” or “Great game tonight!” go a long way with the child who thrives on praise. Your words can focus on personality, accomplishments, outward appearance or anything else that affirms. Giving a monetary reward to a child who seeks affirmation will leave him feeling empty.

Acts of service

In the early stages of life, we do things for our children that they can’t do for themselves. As they get older, our love is expressed by teaching them how to do things for themselves. For a child with this love language, we need to know which acts of service are important to him. Does he feel loved when you help him with homework? Or teach him to throw a ball? Once you’ve discovered the acts of service your child most appreciates, perform them often.

Gifts

Children with this love language treasure gifts as a tangible token of affection. Unfortunately, they also interpret a lack of gifts as a lack of love. Your gifts don’t need to be expensive, and they don’t need to be given every day, but recognizing that a child prefers to be rewarded with a pack of gum rather than a hug is an important step in building communication.

Quality time

Children who speak this love language seek undivided attention. When they’re infants, we play on the floor with them and roll balls back and forth. As they get older, that quality time is found in conversations, bedtime stories or backyard sports. The activity is not important; the time together is. For a child with siblings, it may be difficult to get one-on-one time with Mom or Dad. He needs to know that he is worthy of your undivided attention.

Physical touch

 We’ve long known the emotional power of physical touch. Infants who are held fare better than those who are not. As children get older, they still long for physical affection — something as simple as a touch on the arm, a pat on the back, a hug. These gestures are especially important to the child with this love language. He wants to literally feel your love.

Chapman recommends that as we focus on our child’s primary love language, we remember to use the other four as well. Though children receive love best from one language, there’s no doubt they benefit from all expressions of unconditional love.

Dynamic CTA Template Below

Your Teen Needs You Most of All

No parent of teens is perfect and even the best can learn how to better connect with their son or daughter. Get practical action steps to better connect with your teenager in 8 Essential Tips for Parenting Your Teen in this FREE video series!

There Is Still Hope for Your Marriage

You may feel that there is no hope for your marriage and the hurt is too deep to restore the relationship and love that you once had. The truth is, your life and marriage can be better and stronger than it was before. In fact, thousands of marriages, situations as complex and painful as yours, have been transformed with the help of professionals who understand where you are right now and care deeply about you and your spouse’s future. You can restore and rebuild your marriage through a personalized, faith-based, intimate program called, Hope Restored.

There Is Still Hope for Your Marriage

You may feel that there is no hope for your marriage and the hurt is too deep to restore the relationship and love that you once had. The truth is, your life and marriage can be better and stronger than it was before. In fact, thousands of marriages, situations as complex and painful as yours, have been transformed with the help of professionals who understand where you are right now and care deeply about you and your spouse’s future. You can restore and rebuild your marriage through a personalized, faith-based, intimate program called, Hope Restored.

There Is Still Hope for Your Marriage

You may feel that there is no hope for your marriage and the hurt is too deep to restore the relationship and love that you once had. The truth is, your life and marriage can be better and stronger than it was before. In fact, thousands of marriages, situations as complex and painful as yours, have been transformed with the help of professionals who understand where you are right now and care deeply about you and your spouse’s future. You can restore and rebuild your marriage through a personalized, faith-based, intimate program called, Hope Restored.
Raising Your Kids to Defend the Faith (1)

Raising Your Kids to Defend Their Faith

“Raising Your Kids to Defend Their Faith” is a series of five short videos, created to get you started in teaching your kids the fundamentals of Christianity, so they can understand it, explain it, and defend it.

Reconnected: The Digital Experience

Reconnected: The Digital Experience is an online study group that offers a 7-part video series designed to help couples discover the characteristics of roommate-like marriages and learn reconnection strategies such as pillow talk, uniting spiritually and dream sharing to break out of boredom and establish deep, heart-felt communication. The Reconnected Digital Experience includes: Seven teaching videos, online study guide and access to additional tools and resources to help you and your spouse reconnect.
Share:
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email

You May Also Like